Asset Allocation Models

Solutions For Diversification
Our Asset Allocation models are based on your financial situation, tolerance for risk, & investment goals.

The Benefits of Asset Allocation Modeling

As an individual investor, you can access the same strategic asset allocation models provided to our business and corporate clients. We provide the opportunity to benefit from changing market cycles through a higher degree of diversification, which can potentially help reduce overall portfolio risk. Select the sample models below to learn about each one.

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Chart is for illustrative purposes only, and should not be considered a recommendation for your own asset allocation requirements.
  • Bonds (0)
  • Short-Term (100%)
  • Domestic Stocks (0)
  • International Stocks (0)

Short Term

Risk Level: low

A short-term asset allocation has a typical time horizon of 1-2 years. It is usually used by investors who plan to make a major purchase in the near future. Types of investments include:

  • Cash
  • Certificates of Deposit
  • Short-term U.S. Treasuries
  • Money Market Funds
  • Other Cash Equivalents

All models are for educational purposes and should not be considered as a recommendation for your own portfolio. Each clients situation is different based on suitability. Contact your investment management team for details.
  • Bonds (50%)
  • Short-Term (30%)
  • Domestic Stocks (15%)
  • International Stocks (5%)

Conservative

Risk Level: low to moderate

Investors who choose a conservative asset allocation model have a low tolerance for risk. Types of investments include:

  • Cash
  • Certificates of Deposit
  • Short-term U.S. Treasuries
  • Money Market Funds
  • Other Cash Equivalents
  • Domestic Stocks
  • International Stocks
  • Bonds and Other Fixed Income Products

  • Bonds (40%)
  • Short-Term (10%)
  • Domestic Stocks (35%)
  • International Stocks (15%)

Balanced

Risk Level: moderate

A Balanced Asset Allocation model strives to take advantage of opportunities in both the bond and stock markets by spreading asset classes proportionally. Investors who choose this model can tolerate a moderate level of risk. Types of investments include:

  • Cash
  • Certificates of Deposit
  • Short-term U.S. Treasuries
  • Money Market Funds
  • Other Cash Equivalents
  • Domestic Stocks
  • International Stocks
  • Bonds and Other Fixed Income Products

  • Bonds (25%)
  • Short-Term (5%)
  • Domestic Stocks (50%)
  • International Stocks (20%)

Growth

Risk Level: moderate to high

Growth Asset Allocation models aim to provide growth that exceeds common benchmarks, such as the S&P 500 or the Russell 2000. People who choose this model are able to tolerate a moderate to high amount of risk. Types of investments include:

  • Cash
  • Certificates of Deposit
  • Short-term U.S. Treasuries
  • Money Market Funds
  • Other Cash Equivalents
  • Domestic Stocks
  • International Stocks
  • Bonds and Other Fixed Income Products

  • Bonds (25%)
  • Short-Term (0%)
  • Domestic Stocks (60%)
  • International Stocks (15%)

Aggressive Growth

Risk Level: high

Aggressive Growth Asset Allocation models strive for superior growth. People who select this model can tolerate high levels of risk in exchange for a potentially better-than-average rate of return. Types of investments include:

  • Domestic Stocks
  • International Stocks
  • Bonds and Other Fixed Income Products

  • Bonds (0%)
  • Short-Term (0%)
  • Domestic Stocks (70%)
  • International Stocks (30%)

Most Aggressive

Risk Level: very high

The Most Aggressive Asset Allocation model invests in both domestic and international stocks, striving for an exceptional rate of return. People that choose this model assume the highest level of risk, and are able to tolerate large swings in the value of their portfolio. Types of investments include:

  1. Domestic Stocks
  2. International Stocks

1. See Brison, Gary P., Hood, Rudolph L., and Beebower, Gilbert L. (1986). “Determinants of Portfolio Performance,” Financial Analysts Journal vol. 42 (4), July/August pages 39-44 (reprint, 1995, Financial Analysts Journal 51 (1), pages 133-138, 50th Anniversary Issue). Gary P. Brinson, Brian D. Singer, and Gilbert L. Beebower, 1991, “Determinants of Portfolio Performance II: An Update,” Financial Analysts Journal 47 (3), pages 40-48; Roger G. Ibbotson and Paul D. Kaplan, 2000, “Does Asset Allocation Policy Explain 40, 90, or 100 Percent of Performance?”, Financial Analysts Journal 56 (1), pages 26-33.

2. The model portfolio’s asset class weightings may deviate from the sample allocation shown.